Ori Kawarthas

Elective Surgical Procedures

Shoulder Replacement

There are two main types of shoulder replacement surgery: Anatomical and Reverse shoulder replacement. Below is a brief overview of both options.

Peterborough's Choice for Shoulder Replacement Surgery

Anatomical Shoulder Replacement

  • Those with arthritis of the shoulder joint and are experiencing severe pain and/or disability despite trying non-surgical treatment
  • Those who have had severe fractures of the shoulder joint

In a shoulder replacement surgery, the arthritic or damaged parts of the joint will be removed and replaced with artificial components. The surgeon may choose to remove the ball, socket of the joint, or both.

  • Pain is normal after surgery and should subside in the weeks to months following
  • A sling is worn for 2 weeks after surgery
  • Driving a car is not typically allowed for 2-4 weeks after surgery
  • Avoid pushing yourself up in bed or a chair with the surgical arm
  • Regularly complete your home exercise program prescribed by your physiotherapist to avoid stiffness and weakness
  • Most people experience a significant reduction of their pain and improved use of their arm.

Reverse Shoulder Replacement

Those with severe rotator cuff tears that cannot be repaired with or without osteoarthritis of the shoulder

In a reverse shoulder replacement the normal ball-and-socket structure of the shoulder is reversed. An artificial ball is attached to the shoulder blade, while a socket is attached to the arm bone. The deltoid muscle that overlays the shoulder joint is then responsible for moving the arm.

  • Your arm will be in a sling following surgery
  • You can remove your sling to do gentle range of motion exercises
  • Most patients will achieve significant pain relief following surgery
  • Shoulder motion is typically improved following surgery, however may not be fully restored

The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that provide stability to the shoulder joint. Weakness, pain and restricted movement can be a result when the rotator cuff becomes damaged. In many cases, the rotator cuff can be repaired, or rehabilitated with therapy  However in very large tears your orthopaedic surgeon may recommend a reverse shoulder replacement. In these cases a reverse shoulder replacement may be a better way to reduce pain and improve the joints function.

In a reverse shoulder replacement the normal ball-and-socket structure of the shoulder is reversed. An artificial ball is attached to the shoulder blade, while a socket is attached to the arm bone. The deltoid muscle that overlays the shoulder joint is then responsible for moving the arm. 

Most patients will achieve significant pain relief following surgery. Shoulder motion may not be fully restored, however it is typically improved following surgery.

Please feel free to contact ORIK for more information on Shoulder Replacement or to book an appointment with our specialists.

Ori Kawarthas